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FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: Good hardcore IT job stats -- for the UK
« Last post by benali72 on February 09, 2017, 09:46:17 PM »
Thanks for the salary conversion, Unix. I recall a few years ago that UK IT support staff generally had lower salaries than in the US, but supposedly there was more job security (less contracting or temp work). I don't know whether that's still true.
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FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: Good hardcore IT job stats -- for the UK
« Last post by unix on February 09, 2017, 04:10:32 PM »
http://finance.yahoo.com/currency-converter/?bypass=true#from=GBP;to=GBP;amt=1.2517

1 British Pound = 1.25 USD

so, multiple all these values by 1.25

e.g. Unix sysadmin 45 GBP = 56 USD



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Discussions - Public / Here's why win drivers work so well
« Last post by benali72 on February 09, 2017, 02:54:33 PM »
Here's why you always get the right win driver you need.... http://uk.news.yahoo.com/fix-windows-10-driver-problems-181709439.html
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FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: Good hardcore IT job stats -- for the UK
« Last post by I D Shukhov on February 09, 2017, 12:38:32 PM »
Interesting.  I don't see how things would be different for the U.S.

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In the companies I worked for, which were mainly government contractors, there was a functional design document  from which a critical design document was created.   Programming started after the CDD was created.  At least that's how most big projects got started.

This is probably old school, and may have always been a government requirement.   Probably most places use some form of agile development nowadays that is less top-heavy on design.

An automated programmer is going to need the expected inputs defined and what form the output is going to be, as well as what resources in the form of data and software it can use.  It would create a solution based on what design patterns it knows about.

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Quote
Technically, a programmer is someone who turns a design into an implementation.

Well that's just like your opinion man.

Here's mine:

http://www.developerdotstar.com/mag/articles/reeves_design_main.html
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To answer this question, we need to first define the scope of what is being asked.

A programmer does two different things:
a. digs in and understands the problem better than any one else
b. designs and writes the program to solve that problem

It is possible to create a machine that will select from a set of existing designs and writes a modified version of the predefined program that will run.

However, the first part is something that humans do far better.

Why? When Watson can analyze X-Rays better than humans can, why can't it do that for programming problems?

The problem isn't doing analysis on a specific domain. The problem is that the domain is constantly shifting. Thus, the human capacity for learning, coping with a changing environment, and changing outcomes is far greater than that of AI.
Technically, a programmer is someone who turns a design into an implementation.   An automated programmer (AP) wouldn't do requirements analysis and design.  These would be done the old-fashioned way by humans who would continue to gather requirements and have design reviews, etc.  The AP  would know how to use software technologies like Oracle and full-stack web programming to turn these designs into code.   The AP would get handed the program specs in a design language.

It would have a memory of low-level and enterprise design patterns.

Right now, an AP wouldn't be much good for maintaining existing programs, but it would be excellent at maintaining code it had written.   As time goes on when more code is written by the AP maintenance costs would go way down.   Since maintenance consumes most of a software budget, this would be the best reason to have an AP.

The AP could easily adhere to the practice of agile development.  It would write its own automated tests, use a version control program and write incremental code.  The longest part of its sprint cycle would be for humans to sign off on what it had done.  Development and testing would take about 60 seconds.





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Discussions - Public / Re: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review
« Last post by I D Shukhov on February 09, 2017, 02:34:33 AM »
I occasionally use Ubuntu, which I've installed in a VirtualBox virtual machine.  I see that I'm woefully out of date with my release, being 12.04 LTS.  It used to be mainly for learning software when I was working in IT.

I spend a lot of time in Word, which for me is the killer app bar none (along with Chrome and occasionally Excel).  I've never used any OpenOffice types of alternatives to Microsoft office, and I'd have to convince myself that they are as good as Word and Excel before I would regularly use Linux.

You can actually run Microsoft Office including Word, Excel etc on Linux using a product called Crossover Linux.  This is a compatibility layer built on top of Wine.  You can read up on it here and see what software runs using Crossover.

https://www.codeweavers.com/products/crossover-linux
I'd have to use it Feb-April each year for TurboTax   :(
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Discussions - Public / Re: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review
« Last post by benali72 on February 08, 2017, 07:41:29 PM »
Thanks for the update, ilconsiglliere.  Interesting to hear what you learned.

As far as Word and Excel compatibility go, I use LibreOffice 100% -- and I trade files with Windows users. I don't have any problems.

But I should mention the folks I interact with still use .doc and .xls formats. I don't have much experience trading files in the newer formats with Win users to report.

Funny, all these years since MS introduced the newer file formats in Office 2007, and much of the business world still operates with the old formats for compatiblity between diffedrent business entities. Go figure.
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FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Good hardcore IT job stats -- for the UK
« Last post by benali72 on February 08, 2017, 07:15:21 PM »
Good hardcore IT job stats with excellent drill-down detail -- unfortunately for the UK   

see http://www.itjobswatch.co.uk/
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