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Discussions - Public / Re: So they upgraded from Windows 7 to 10...
« Last post by unix on February 06, 2018, 07:57:19 PM »
I am amazed they cannot standardize on Linux and come up with something really idiot-proof.
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Discussions - Public / Re: So they upgraded from Windows 7 to 10...
« Last post by The Gorn on February 06, 2018, 01:34:56 PM »
It is XFCE. Things occasionally change somewhat randomly when I log in for some sessions. One recent example is that when I rebooted I lost the "Whisker" menu. I found it in the toolbar preferences, but then the layout of the menu was completely different from what I really preferred, and I lost every single Favorited program. I finally got back the G*ddamned menu I wanted by locating the whisker menu settings files under ~/.config, on a recent backup, and copying over the main desktop's files from  the backup. No thanks whatsoever in any way to the wizards who write the spotty and poorly structured documentation for this garbage.

But the main ongoing issue I now have with Linux is that it's just not crisp in use. Almost anything I do, regardless of being in an application or being in the desktop, seems to have a slight lag between clicking or double clicking and the response/action. 

I have 12 GB, and I'm using the official Nvidia driver for my graphics card rather than the generic video support. Also the memory use is quite low and I'm never even close to going into swap.

Windows has a far, far superior desktop feel to Linux. This is pretty close but no cigar. And I have to fight very hard for the knowledge to set up trivial creature comforts such as the Windows key mapping of the keypad (which treats the numeric keypad differently depending on shift status.) I never know what any of this shit is called and there are dozens of "config programs".

Linux is a poorly thought out amateurish mess. That's exactly what it is - amateurish and not professional - hackers dicked with it until it kind of works. 

But at least unlike WIndows its design intent is not to screw the consumer or user out of the use of their data.I can live with that for now.
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Discussions - Public / Re: So they upgraded from Windows 7 to 10...
« Last post by pxsant on February 06, 2018, 01:19:12 PM »
Pxsant here has criticized my own criticism of Linux and claims that everything I've stated is off base, that Linux is perfectly reliable and stable and user-friendly. So that's a differing opinion.

I am trying to remember which version of Mint you installed.  I think it was XFCE right?   If so, that might account for the issues you have seen.  XFCE is the least stable of the three common versions (Cinnamon, Mate and XFCE) available for Mint.    My personal favorite is actually Mate.   I like the Mate menu system better than the Cinnamon menu system.  Both Cinnamon and Mate are very stable.

VirtualBox is a great tool.   I have Windows XP, Windows 7 and Windows 10 all running in VM's on my main Linux Mint mate box.
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Discussions - Public / Re: So they upgraded from Windows 7 to 10...
« Last post by The Gorn on February 06, 2018, 08:14:21 AM »
Gorn, yes, the Win 10 was moving faster than the prior Wins I've had.  Booting much faster.  I'll have to give it that.  It's just the whole deal of having no control of my own hardware, the paid antivirus "yearly tax", the updates hassle, the always imminent OS crashes, etc., that put me off. I've been using some form of Ubuntu or Mint for years, and I don't remember an update or upgrade ever having gone wrong.  They just work, and quickly, and 75% time don't request reboot to complete.  It just works.  And it's free.  On the contrary, Windows updates always seem funky, don't tell you much when they go wrong, and just leave me feeling I am working with a toy.  And the Windows always seem more prone to hacks.  I will say the government agencies and big corps I worked for had it a little better, with dedicated systems admins.  Even then, they were less stable than my home linux box.  And when Windows goes annual subscription, I'll have to pay Bill and his minions yearly for their malfeasance.

Will keep the virtual box approach in mind for future, though.

I keep thinking "it would be nice if Mint Linux had {insert feature that is convenient, quick,  accessible and reliable in Windows}". But I think of the MANY hassles and problems with Windows when you care for it on a PC, especially as the install of the OS ages and you install, deinstall, and update many things over the months or years.

Linux is much rougher around the edges than Windows and many hackers with poor and limited documentation or usability skills have contributed nonetheless vital programs and utilities to the Linux user base.

One example is that stuff on my desktop will just not work one day in Linux when I boot up. The "program menu" will vanish, or the desktop will degrade to a weird different set of icons, or certain taskbar notification icons for networking or whatever will vanish, or the very specific Windows like keypad mapping I need so that I can type without stopping and thinking will just disappear. Then queue up 15 - 90 minutes of dicking around looking for a fix, against a background of multiple windows managers used with Linux, so advice someone gives may simply not even be applicable.

Pxsant here has criticized my own criticism of Linux and claims that everything I've stated is off base, that Linux is perfectly reliable and stable and user-friendly. So that's a differing opinion.

The point is, Linux is a house of cards when it comes to trivial usability stuff that you can work around if need be. Windows is a house of cards of locking up your machine, or destroying your data through unbreakable encryption, or requiring you to buy something to keep it running reliability.

As far as VirtualBox, if your tech skills don't include it, it is quite easy to stumble through. One big advantage of VBox and making Windows a guest OS under it is that the entire Windows install including  the C: drive and all programs and settings becomes a massive .vhd file that you can copy off to backup storage or duplicate for additional Windows OSs on the same VBox install.

Using Windows as a guest OS under a virtual machine program like VirtualBox kind of packages up and isolates Windows so you can deal with it as a separate maintenance issue.
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Discussions - Public / Re: Bitcoin Going to 0?
« Last post by The Gorn on February 06, 2018, 08:02:46 AM »
I Told You So

So, waiting for Crypto to rise to the occasion here... really.
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Discussions - Public / Re: Bitcoin Going to 0?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on February 06, 2018, 08:00:40 AM »
Whats ITYS?
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Discussions - Public / Re: Bitcoin Going to 0?
« Last post by unix on February 06, 2018, 07:58:54 AM »
Lol.

And ITYS
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Discussions - Public / Bitcoin Going to 0?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on February 06, 2018, 04:54:31 AM »
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Discussions - Public / Re: So they upgraded from Windows 7 to 10...
« Last post by ronin on February 06, 2018, 03:07:36 AM »
Thanks guys.

benali72, yes, think the license would be a roadblock;  Dell came from big box office supply, no license or paperwork for OS that I could find, though maybe could have pestered Dell for it--don't know.  At this point, I have the Clonezilla OS swap down so well that all that really bothers me about it is the massive Winblows updates waiting to ambush me when I put back on machine after six months or so of inactivity.  In the past, I have tried to remember to swap the Windows (7, 8.1 or whatever had been on the machine at purchase) back on every three months or so just to apply updates.  But forgot this last time on the Win 10, so there was bunch of updates waiting.

Gorn, yes, the Win 10 was moving faster than the prior Wins I've had.  Booting much faster.  I'll have to give it that.  It's just the whole deal of having no control of my own hardware, the paid antivirus "yearly tax", the updates hassle, the always imminent OS crashes, etc., that put me off. I've been using some form of Ubuntu or Mint for years, and I don't remember an update or upgrade ever having gone wrong.  They just work, and quickly, and 75% time don't request reboot to complete.  It just works.  And it's free.  On the contrary, Windows updates always seem funky, don't tell you much when they go wrong, and just leave me feeling I am working with a toy.  And the Windows always seem more prone to hacks.  I will say the government agencies and big corps I worked for had it a little better, with dedicated systems admins.  Even then, they were less stable than my home linux box.  And when Windows goes annual subscription, I'll have to pay Bill and his minions yearly for their malfeasance.

Will keep the virtual box approach in mind for future, though.
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Discussions - Public / Ongoing and Never Ending Travails of Linux as a Desktop
« Last post by The Gorn on February 05, 2018, 06:51:43 PM »
^ I was going to suggest EXACTLY the same thing.

I've now been using Linux as a primary desktop for almost 4 months. I recently considered moving back to Windows as the boot OS. Right now I really don't want to do that!

I bought a very cheap copy of Windows 7 Pro from a seller on Ebay ($30) and installed and activated it as a VM under VirtualBox. I need Win7 for Quickbooks, Quicken, and, soon, TurboTax.

Linux has MANY UI and usability quirks that turn me into a raging madman. Also I insist against what aspies may declare, that Linux's UI is consistently slower than Windows. Just not as crisp.

But above all the core of Linux is *predictability*. No forced-upgrade bullshit and no continual battle for my machine and data against Microsoft's fiat imperatives.
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