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31
Discussions - Public / Re: r u Sending Xmas Cards this year?
« Last post by The Gorn on December 09, 2017, 11:32:26 PM »
We do.

Greetings and celebrations need to be exceptional, unusual, unexpected. Otherwise how do you even know  they are celebrations?

Another f*cking emoji someone sends me on Facebook? Easy. Common. Effortless. I know they put no thought into it.

Doesn't mean f*ckin' shit. Has no emotional impact. Yeah yeah, I need to get back to my porn and my Drudge Report. 

A signed greeting card is a 6 sigma social event today. Exceptional, unexpected, welcome.
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Discussions - Public / r u Sending Xmas Cards this year?
« Last post by benali72 on December 09, 2017, 10:39:47 PM »
Do you still send out Christmas or Holiday cards?

With email, voicemail, texting, etc, I got out of the habit years ago. Plus you have to do it right at the busiest time of the year, a real pain.

But this year I'm going back to it. It's a good way to reconnect with people you've lost track of.

How about you?
33
Discussions - Public / Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
« Last post by unix on December 06, 2017, 08:27:09 AM »
Actually LEDs do get hot but the heat is internal. It is not emitted forward with the light. I have a few custom torches that run well above 1000 lumens - sustained - and the essential component in the design is the heat sink. The flashlights have heavy brass or copper heatsinks. Cheaper Chiniese bulbs or torches vastly overstate lumens. They may generate 2000 lumens for 2 minutes and then drop to 800.

Heat is actually a serious problem with LEDS once you get above 800 lumens or so.
34
Discussions - Public / Re: Are All LED TVs Pretty Much The Same?
« Last post by The Gorn on December 05, 2017, 05:12:13 PM »
^ I'm thinking that high refresh rates (well over 72 HZ) are mandatory for LED's and flat screens because the flat screen imaging stuff has no persistence.

Cathode ray tubes had persistence in the phosphor - it would glow for a little while after being hit by electrons - so 60-72 HZ was perfectly adequate. The LEDs basically go out instantly once you stop applying power, so a high refresh rate has to take place to make natural looking motion.

This is more expensive than a lower refresh rate LED flat panel because you need faster processors and electronics to refresh those millions of pixels.
35
Discussions - Public / Re: Are All LED TVs Pretty Much The Same?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on December 05, 2017, 04:59:03 PM »

The thing that's missing is the refresh rate. It really becomes obvious when you are watching anything that involves motion, like sports, or action movies or anything that's moving.

I've had a high end but old  1080 (full HD) unit.. maybe 5 years old. It was a 240Hz refresh rate unit.  It kicked butt showing action movies and sports - and I don't really watch sports.  I upgraded it to a 4K Black Friday unit and it was stunning in terms of details, had that wow factor that the older 1080 lacked.  You could see every microbe on every amoeba on every blade of grass.

However, I noticed that the older one displayed motion better, much better. The new 4K was only 60Hz. You want at least 120 HZ and 240 Hz is even better. There are classic movies that show you how well a TV responds to motion. For example: Matrix, the scene with the rain. The reason it's significant because it also shows you black. An expensive 4K will display blacks as very black, cheaper units will have blacks as slightly gray. That rain scene in Matrix combines both of these difficult functions: Rain at night and tests both of them.

The stuff on Black Friday, the 55" 4K units for $399 you can skip, if you watch action / sports, you won't be happy. Normal news and movies appear just fine however.

Costco/Best buy/Chimart don't play 4K source I don't think, their PQ sucks. They don't play source that really demos the capabilities of the units. They play compressed shyt over the cable, not via a 4K "redray" disk. 
Having said that, I saw some OLED TVs at Best Buy the other day, they were very expensive - well, relatively so but man, the color just jumps at you. Very saturated, life-like. I thought OLED was a BS gimmick.

Thanks for the tips on telling me what to buy. I need to get a new TV but have been casually shopping when I am out. I will wait till after the New Year. I have read a bunch of gibberish on the web but it made my eyes glaze over. You summed it up perfectly for this right brained IT dork.

So here is my question for you - this 4K source that will display so much more - do the cable providers and streaming services (Netflix, Hulu, etc) support this or no?

Because frankly if they are not transmitting in 4K what difference does it matter?
36
Discussions - Public / Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on December 05, 2017, 04:49:30 PM »
Gorn and Ilconsigliere -- I only wish I had your electrical talents. I hope to evolve to your level one day where I won't be paying through the nose for something I could have done myself.

Meanwhile -- I noticed that the new 60-watt-equivalent Ecosmart LEDs I bought from Home Depot are way brighter than the Ecosmart 60-watt-equivalent CFLs I have.

I looked at the lumens, and the brighter bulbs actually have less lumens than the dimmer ones (840 vs 900)!  Say what?  I thought lumens were supposed to be the measure of how bright the bulb is.

Then I discovered that the Kelvin "color temperature" is the definitive factor in my case.

The bulbs with the higher Kelvin CT seem much brighter than those with lower KCT (5500 vs 2700), even tho they have less lumens!

I never knew to look at this before. I incorrectly thought it was all about lumens and incandescent-watt-equivalents.

KCT chart and explanation -- www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html

Its not hard to pick it up. I know you can do it as you are smart. I knew a lot of it from years and years of being around it but there is stuff I didn't know so I got this book many years ago:

Electrical Wiring Residential by Ray C. Mullin.

This is the book that electricians learn from in school. If you buy it new its like $100+ but you can get a copy off of Ebay for $10. No joke. You don't need the latest one which has all the current electrical codes. The codes keep changing all the time. Any book from the last 10 years is good enough. As LEDs are evolving so rapidly they are not typically in the book anyway.

Yes Lumens is a funny thing. I have seen the same thing myself. Kelvin measures the color temperature of the light I typically try to install recessed lights of about 3500-4000 kelvin. To low a temperature the color of the light is more golden, to bright of a temperature - like 5000-6000 its very harsh bright bluefish light.

You can see the color of the light in this picture:





This is very cool. I buy around 5000K. I think sunlight is 3500K or so. I've noticed that all things being equal, 5500K and above actually generates more lumens  - given the same Amps, the same everything but the color rendition really sucks.

I visited this local battery store, they happened to have some unusual LED bulbs. I got this weird green bulb on sale.   For the X-mas season. Consumes just a few bucks annually.  It's actually bright green neon type green, very light green, closer to white really than to green.


There is something about the design of the LED where they emit more lumens in the white to blue spectrum. And are less efficient in the 3500K spectrum.

Yes it is interesting. I bought LEDs for the recessed lights that were in the 3500-4000K range. The the light is quite bright but its not harsh, it looks very natural and color rendition looks normal.

From what I know LEDs are a type of semi-conductor so it might have to do with the manufacturing aspect of the silicon.
37
Discussions - Public / Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on December 05, 2017, 04:45:51 PM »
I can respect that kind of setup. I'd love to have it but can't justify that kind of upfront cost.

Offhand, I'd say that you're rerouting the main power through the gen set's utility box/switchover box.

The house power in a circuit breaker box is a couple of bus bars behind the breakers against the back of the box.

It was pricey - like $9k and $5K of that was for the generator, the transfer switch was like $600 by itself. Here in the people's republic of NJ it would have been even more except the electrician is pals with her husband so they got hooked up. My sister didn't have power for 14 days during Sandy and they now have an elderly person living with them that has stuff that requires power. That is why she got it. It will help on the resale of the house if someday she sells it.

The installation is hairy - the intelligent transfer switch is like 3 feet tall and 1 1/2 feet wide, bolted to the outside of the house. There is a lot stuff in it - more than I would have thought. Both the main from the electric company and power supply from the generator comes into it and it monitors the power supply coming into the house. If the power drops it automatically switches over and starts the generator. You can over ride it of course and make it flip back and forth.

The gas main is 2 inches in diameter into the generator which required a whole lot of piping. She was fortunate because her gas and electric are in the same corner of the basement where all the utilities come in. So the plumber and electrician didn't have to run new wire and pipe across the basement.

My friend when he saw it asked if we had a bunker in the yard ;)  - are you building za rockets, das good?
38
Discussions - Public / Re: Are All LED TVs Pretty Much The Same?
« Last post by The Gorn on December 04, 2017, 05:16:12 PM »
The thing that's missing is the refresh rate. It really becomes obvious when you are watching anything that involves motion, like sports, or action movies or anything that's moving.

A point worth noting and I'm glad I never bothered with the black Friday TV deals.

39
Loco Stories / Humor / Re: Musk introduces the Tesla Semi
« Last post by unix on December 04, 2017, 03:13:34 PM »

True enough. But surely you heard how they introduced this new Li-ion battery that charges in a few minutes..

If that's true, then it changes things.
40
Discussions - Public / Re: Are All LED TVs Pretty Much The Same?
« Last post by unix on December 04, 2017, 03:12:27 PM »

The thing that's missing is the refresh rate. It really becomes obvious when you are watching anything that involves motion, like sports, or action movies or anything that's moving.

I've had a high end but old  1080 (full HD) unit.. maybe 5 years old. It was a 240Hz refresh rate unit.  It kicked butt showing action movies and sports - and I don't really watch sports.  I upgraded it to a 4K Black Friday unit and it was stunning in terms of details, had that wow factor that the older 1080 lacked.  You could see every microbe on every amoeba on every blade of grass.

However, I noticed that the older one displayed motion better, much better. The new 4K was only 60Hz. You want at least 120 HZ and 240 Hz is even better. There are classic movies that show you how well a TV responds to motion. For example: Matrix, the scene with the rain. The reason it's significant because it also shows you black. An expensive 4K will display blacks as very black, cheaper units will have blacks as slightly gray. That rain scene in Matrix combines both of these difficult functions: Rain at night and tests both of them.

The stuff on Black Friday, the 55" 4K units for $399 you can skip, if you watch action / sports, you won't be happy. Normal news and movies appear just fine however.

Costco/Best buy/Chimart don't play 4K source I don't think, their PQ sucks. They don't play source that really demos the capabilities of the units. They play compressed shyt over the cable, not via a 4K "redray" disk. 
Having said that, I saw some OLED TVs at Best Buy the other day, they were very expensive - well, relatively so but man, the color just jumps at you. Very saturated, life-like. I thought OLED was a BS gimmick.





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