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31
Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by The Gorn on September 12, 2017, 08:15:32 AM »
Phone calls are obsolete. I need to get a text only device.   

Communicating with many people, you want the stuff *in writing*.  Text and email constitutes it *in writing* and whatever is said on the phone is vapor and has never been said.

Indeed, the old system of telephone and POTS phone numbers are now almost completely devoid of trust. A caller ID has no meaning today. POTS phone numbers are probably going to go the way of FAX in a few years.
32
Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by unix on September 12, 2017, 05:53:33 AM »

I use this app called Mr. Number, it works but it does block legitimate calls, and yeah, they spoof legitimate numbers.

I don't answer the phone if it's not in one my contacts or something I recognize.

I don't like to talk on the phone, either email or text works much better. I am either driving or in the office when I cannot talk.

My voice mail got full and I forgot the password and haven't cared to reset it.  If I do talk on the phone, I usually need to write something down. Which I usually cannot if I am driving, or if I do, I lose it. So I need a record via email or text I can come back to when I need it.

Phone calls are obsolete. I need to get a text only device.   

Communicating with many people, you want the stuff *in writing*.  Text and email constitutes it *in writing* and whatever is said on the phone is vapor and has never been said.


33
Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by The Gorn on September 11, 2017, 06:09:58 PM »
Here's the problem that has emerged with spam calls:

The callers now spoof legitimate phone numbers, down to your local three digit exchange. So there is virtually no possible defense against spam calls. If you block these numbers you may inadvertently block legitimate callers.

For example, the other day I received a call with the caller ID showing up as KROGER (grocery chain) and the commonly seen three digit exchange. It was one of those G()(*& D(*&(*&   --- "Why hello. Our records show that you stayed at one of our resorts...".

Commercial dialing systems used by telemarketers (such as "predictive calling" systems) have a means to spoof the origination, but do so legitimately with the source number's consent. A few years ago a guy I hired to try telemarketing for me did this. His system first made a test call to my number that would show up to called parties, and I had to press a digit to OK it and give my consent. Once I OKd it, he could make calls on my behalf with his system.

The current scam practice seems to be to use software that lets telemarketers plug in any number with no validation.
34
Discussions - Public / How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by JoFrance on September 11, 2017, 03:35:24 PM »
I have an IPhone 4S.  Okay, I know its old, but even though I can block the spam calls its a game of whack a mole.  Does anyone out there have a solution that is better than the standard stuff offered by Apple?  I read about Truecaller that is community based, but don't know if its any good.

35
FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: AI and Robotics: new opportunity areas?
« Last post by benali72 on September 11, 2017, 03:33:04 PM »
I worked with expert system software years ago on a project. It was great for that particular application, which would have been very hard to program otherwise. But it only addresses a certain set of problems -- the need for expertise where the domain is known and the rules can be precisely expressed.

I think JoFrance has an interesting idea that AI may be at long last bursting out of its previous limitations. I guess we'll see over the next 5 or 10 years.
36
Discussions - Public / Re: So I jumped on the 4K bandwagon
« Last post by unix on September 08, 2017, 05:08:52 PM »

You never want to go back  to anything under 4K once you have 4K. Netflix automatically upgrades you to 4K if they detect your HDTV.

I've never seen Game of Thrones, don't get the whole genre.  I cannot keep up even with 5% of Netflix.
37
FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: AI and Robotics: new opportunity areas?
« Last post by unix on September 05, 2017, 07:03:13 PM »
Interesting points you make.
38
FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: AI and Robotics: new opportunity areas?
« Last post by The Gorn on September 05, 2017, 10:40:51 AM »
I have a background in AI as I did it in college and than in defense. I know way to much about it. Device intelligence like what unix posted about fridge, security, your car and other household appliances is not really true AI. Early AI was glorified rule patterns that were like this:

If ABC = XYZ than
   Do  DEF
Else
    If GHI than
        Do DEF

This is an expert system. Rules - based automation. Essentially you have access to higher level testable conditions (IE, you're not testing program variables as such) and you trigger real world actions based on the tests. I never worked with expert systems but I recognize the basic concept.

If Trump wins 2016 election than
   Do  Pepe_memes
Else
    If Hillary wins 2016 than
        Do Nuke Haiti


The other major branch of 1980-90s AI was neural networks, which had the attribute of fuzzy logic. Today you have many models of counter top rice cookers that use fuzzy logic (I guess it avoids burning the rice.)

A good short definition here at the top o' the page: https://www.google.com/search?q=neural+network+fuzzy+logic&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

I surmise that neural networks can "learn" and grow in functional capabilities. Rules based systems are more like compiled software.

In terms of digital computing I don't know of any other AI type tech.

By modern standards of newness, both of these technologies are older than snot.
39
FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: AI and Robotics: new opportunity areas?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on September 05, 2017, 10:06:54 AM »
We'll have to clean up talk like referring to offshore labor as tards in the new site...

 :D :D :D :D :D

Kidding!

Just like any boom time economy, the Indians thought the gravy train would run on forever. That's as simple an analysis as it gets. Capitalist economies all experience booms and busts.

I'm personally happy the sector is experiencing pain.  It's well deserved for ruining and then nepotistically running IT in the US.

I could have easily just put Replaceable IT Tards :) . LOL.

I have a background in AI as I did it in college and than in defense. I know way to much about it. Device intelligence like what unix posted about fridge, security, your car and other household appliances is not really true AI. Early AI was glorified rule patterns that were like this:

If ABC = XYZ than
   Do  DEF
Else
    If GHI than
        Do DEF

This is mostly what these devices are doing. What has held AI back in the past was computing power and cost. The computing power was not there and even it was the cost was astronomical. On top of this the languages used for AI tended to be quite bloated and required tons of computing power. You couldnt really have one or the other. Where AI starts to shine is software that learns patterns as it goes and starts building out its own rules. Over time it just keeps learning different patterns and putting in more and more rules. The problem in the past was the rule structure keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger. Eventually it becomes far larger than the hardware can handle.

This is not really the case now. Hardware is dirt cheap so all kinds of things are possible that werent before. The end result is you are starting to see device intelligence that wasnt possible before. Now you can just keep scaling the computing power.

All this stuff now of being able to control the lights, heating, fridge and whatever else in your house remotely IMO is quite dangerous. I have seen locks you can unlock via your iPhone. Do you honestly want your house remotely controlled so that a hacker can lock you out of your house and take control of everything in it? No thanks. The same thing applies to cars - do you really want a car that the hackers can come visiting when they want. Again, no thanks.

Now true AI intelligence where the machine makes its own decisions about things it can do is a ways off. I have read quite about the chess computers that have beat the chess masters. Those machines have beat the masters via brute computing power, its not that they are actually intelligent. They just have huge lists of rules. Stuff like the movie Colussus is a long way off.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRq7Muf6CKg

As far as AI being the next big thing for IT tards, I would not take that bet. They said solar and 3D printing was going to be the next big thing for IT as well. All the solar is now being made in China now, 3D printing - eh I dont know.

If you want to stay in IT I am of the opinion you need to find a niche that the H1B hoards have not invaded or cant invade.  I have read that functional programming is a growing thing:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_programming

But its very difficult to learn which should keep the script kiddies and idiots out of it. Or you can focus on something they cant do, I took the latter approach and focused on human skills that cant be easily learned from a book and there is no cert for it.
40
Discussions - Public / Re: Two Interesting Weather Sites
« Last post by benali72 on September 05, 2017, 06:16:41 AM »
Fascinating different view that you get from the weather sites. Thanks.
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