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A lot of these guys have the 2 layer thing (2 consulting companies between them and the client) going on. The lowest level usually controls the person's visa and take an exorbitant cut from them in the order of 40-60%.The middle layer is usually taking like 10%. They dont make that much based on what I have seen despite the billing rate being substantial. Most of them are smart enough to apply for their green card as soon as they get though it can take a long time.

Its pretty sad actually because it could just as easily be any of us. 
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Discussions - Public / H1B Predator destroys Uber
« Last post by Code Refugee on February 27, 2017, 07:46:48 PM »
So this guy Amit Singhal was born in India. Came to the US for school, ended up staying on one of those sorts of visas. OK, not H1B, but it's like H1B. He works at Google from 2000 to 2016 where becomes a fellow of Google and the ACM. However, at Google he sexually harasses employees there and is dismissed because of it.

He then is hired as engineering VP at Uber, but he lies to them about why he left Google. At Uber he continues his predator ways, creating lots of problems for them. And he is eventually fired after the company loses value due to employees and former employees talking about Uber's nightmare of misogyny and sexual harassment from executives...

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/27/technology/uber-sexual-harassment-amit-singhal-resign.html

This all appears to be as a result of the investigation by former USAG Eric Holder into Susan Fowler's complaints about Uber. (https://www.susanjfowler.com/blog/2017/2/19/reflecting-on-one-very-strange-year-at-uber)

However, Susan says she left Uber in December 2016 after a year of harassment.

Amit Singhal started working at Uber in January 2017, after Susan left.

Looks like Holder found a fall guy.

What's the name of the real executive that harassed Fowler? Cos that guy isn't being fired.
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An H-1B told me her husband was severely abused at other jobs.  It sounded really bad what they were doing to him.  However, the big government contractor I worked for appeared to treat them no differently, as far as working hours, than anyone else.  Pay may well have been another matter.  Now that I think about it, two of them I worked closely with had M.S. degrees in engineering from good schools and were at a low grade level.  They were young, though.

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Quote
Contrast that with IT people where the only getting they get is short end of a pink slip where you were replaced with someone cheaper.

Keep in mind that I was not attempting to compare doctors with software developers. My point was that unlike some jobs/professions where problems and gripes tend to be universal there has always been (and still is) a lot of conflicting stories out there. For example, I did a quick Google search using the keyword "H-1B" and limited my search to results from just the past week. Below is an excerpt from an article that I found on the first results page.

...Within two weeks, Mogal had three job offers. He now works as a software engineer for EverQuote in Kendall Square making around $150,000 a year .... 

[further down in the article]
Mogal said employers are not hiring foreigners because it's a financially smart decision; hiring an H-1B worker over an American can be pricey. Companies have to pay lawyer fees, and, in some cases, H-1B transfer fees. "If I was running a business, I wouldn't hire myself in theory," Mogal said with a laugh. Companies do not do that because they like paying that much more. It’s just because of the scarcity of developers that we have here," Mogal said.

[Excerpts taken from this article]
H-1B Visas: Stealing American Jobs Or A Solution To A Tech Shortage?
http://www.wbur.org/bostonomix/2017/02/23/h1b-visas-debate
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Quote
I read this article in which the author seems surprised that some companies abuse H1B's in the IT sector... That surprises me. Every single shop where I've worked with H1Bs, I've seen them abused in some manner.

The author's ignorance is not surprising to me, because I believe that the ignorance problem goes way beyond stating that the author of that article has simply not been exposed to the proper information.

I do not have a quick and simple way to say what the ignorance problems are beyond stating that "the scope of the computer hardware and software job market is very diverse. As a result, there is going to be a lot of unknown unknowns out there or issues that are not applicable to everybody".

I am going to quickly compare the H-1B article with another one from the same website (see below). Imo, the article mentioned below does a good job of describing how brutal residencies actually are or how American doctors "still in training mode" get abused. The main difference between the two articles is that I as an article reader can extrapolate that abuse across an entire industry and understand that this abuse is something that is applicable to all American doctors.

Why So Many Young Doctors Work Such Awful Hours
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/02/doctors-long-hours-schedules/516639/?single_page=true

Yes doctors get abused during residency. This is well known and it does suck. However once in private practice people like us pay them $250 to see them for 10 minutes. Its not uncommon especially if they are a specialist. Doctors get theirs in the end.

Contrast that with IT people where the only getting they get is short end of a pink slip where you were replaced with someone cheaper.
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Quote
I read this article in which the author seems surprised that some companies abuse H1B's in the IT sector... That surprises me. Every single shop where I've worked with H1Bs, I've seen them abused in some manner.

The author's ignorance is not surprising to me, because I believe that the ignorance problem goes way beyond stating that the author of that article has simply not been exposed to the proper information.

I do not have a quick and simple way to say what the ignorance problems are beyond stating that "the scope of the computer hardware and software job market is very diverse. As a result, there is going to be a lot of unknown unknowns out there or issues that are not applicable to everybody".

I am going to quickly compare the H-1B article with another one from the same website (see below). Imo, the article mentioned below does a good job of describing how brutal residencies actually are or how American doctors "still in training mode" get abused. The main difference between the two articles is that I as an article reader can extrapolate that abuse across an entire industry and understand that this abuse is something that is applicable to all American doctors.

Why So Many Young Doctors Work Such Awful Hours
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/02/doctors-long-hours-schedules/516639/?single_page=true
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Nope. They screw them big time. A guy I work with has his h1b visa being held by the consulting company so he is trapped.
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Thanks, ilconsiglliere, I never heard of this before. Good to know. Cheers.
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You are right about the aluminum wiring, its a scourge. I don't know what years it was prevalent but my Dad warned me about it in house and its to be avoided apparently.

Being techie you probably know about this already but the aluminum wiring is bad for two big reasons: 1) inherently low capacity - the resistivity of aluminum is far higher than copper, EG, a given cross section of AL can carry a lot less current than the same cross section of Cu. Makes the wires heat up. 2) often the developers (aluminum was being used by cheapass developers) would use conventional copper outlets, switches and terminations with aluminum, creating instantaneous severe corrosion wherever copper touches aluminum. (Essentially, the different metals in contact with a continuous electrical current creates the type of electrolysis that is used to plate metals.)

I mean, Jesus, didn't anyone think this through? "NO".

Upshot - aluminum wired houses have many points of failure to spark electrical fires.

It was all about costs.
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All of the wire between the two Zyxcel units is new copper, so yes, it is a long run but optimal in terms of materials. No old post wiring and no aluminum wiring (a plague from 1970s houses, I'm told.)

If the MOCA adapters are > $70 apiece I just think that's a bit high in light of how alternatives are priced. You need to buy one for each end, I surmise.  Unless that's a price for a pair.

It depends on your router, Verizon's router runs Moca by default so you only need to buy the end point where you want the ethernet. If your router does not have Moca you will need to buy one for the router as well.

You are right about the aluminum wiring, its a scourge. I don't know what years it was prevalent but my Dad warned me about it in house and its to be avoided apparently.
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