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Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by I D Shukhov on September 17, 2017, 08:25:14 AM »
I'd try Nomorobo:  https://www.nomorobo.com/.  The pricing is at the bottom:  $1.99/mo.  VoIP landlines are free and the blocking is very good.  Not 100%, but I'm very happy.  (But maybe that's because the price is right  :-X)

I'm not sure how Nomorobo builds its database.   I think they may do it partially based on the wisdom of crowds because when I report a robocall they missed they ask when I received the call and "just now" is an option.  So if 1,000s of reports come in for any number -- spoofed or not -- "just now" they know it's a fake number.

Also, maybe VoIP has a protocol where parts of it can't be spoofed and can be used to identify the source.

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Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by I D Shukhov on September 17, 2017, 08:21:39 AM »

Indeed, the old system of telephone and POTS phone numbers are now almost completely devoid of trust. A caller ID has no meaning today. POTS phone numbers are probably going to go the way of FAX in a few years.
Right.  I don't know why any legitimate company, like a financial institution, would even ask for it or why I should give it to such companies.  I assume any call is spam unless I recognize the number as someone I know personally or am expecting a call from -- like a car repair shop.   The spammers have actually rendered telephones useless for anyone not in your contacts list.

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Discussions - Public / Re: The two best articles I've seen on the Equifax Hack
« Last post by unix on September 15, 2017, 06:12:51 PM »
So you have utterly no control over your data. They take it without your consent.
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Discussions - Public / The two best articles I've seen on the Equifax Hack
« Last post by ArnoldW2 on September 15, 2017, 03:31:07 PM »

Part I of Dealing with the Equifax Hack

$4 Trillion in Profit Potential when “Big Data” Becomes Too Big…

Equifax announced last week that the intensely private personal data it had in its possession for 143 million Americans had been hacked.

That’s 1 in every 2 people — — even if you NEVER did business with Equifax and NEVER became their customer.  Not a single American signed up for this and there is not a single regulatory body that is likely to put the company out of business.

And the breach is vastly worse than other hacks.  Equifax maintained the financial equivalent of the “Holy Grail.” Social security numbers, driver license numbers, addresses, bank accounts, date of birth, and more.  Everything needed to create a “new you.”

What really chaps my hide is that criminals can now use this information to file tax returns, claim refunds, access medical records, rent apartments, buy houses, take out loans and more – all without you knowing for years to come.

This goes waaaaaaay beyond simple identity theft.

https://totalwealthresearch.com/2017/09/part-i-4-trillion-in-profit-potential-when-big-data-becomes-too-big/




Part II of Dealing with the Equifax Hack

What's happened to Equifax's databases goes far beyond simple data theft.

It is extremely important you protect yourself and your money NOW.

Equifax, unfortunately, doesn’t want to make this easy.

The company’s website stinks. What’s more, it’s clearly written by corporate lawyers who appear more interested in protecting Equifax’s interests than yours.

You can’t change your social security number so that’s out.

But you can “freeze” your credit.

If you’ve never heard the term before, that’s a process that creates a permanent hold on your credit files that prevents the credit bureaus from releasing your credit to any company except those that you specifically designate (or those that already have you as a customer), law enforcement and the court system, or specific government agencies under the terms of the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

This article has four links to help you get started.

A few more data thefts a la Equifax is all it’ll take to bring Big Data to the forefront.

The problem will get worse before it gets better. It also means that individuals, companies, and entire countries will spend whatever they must to protect themselves.

Companies that profit by selling computer security products will be good investments.  Equifax is only one of dozens of attacks to come and, as nasty a thought as that may be, it’s also a sign of tremendous opportunity.

https://totalwealthresearch.com/2017/09/part-ii-what-to-do-and-which-stocks-to-buy-to-immediately-protect-your-money/
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Discussions - Public / Re: So you thought two-factor authentication was secure, did you?
« Last post by unix on September 15, 2017, 06:06:38 AM »


I have a friend who deleted his Gulag account. Maybe I should follow his example.
26
Discussions - Public / So you thought two-factor authentication was secure, did you?
« Last post by ArnoldW2 on September 14, 2017, 03:24:43 PM »

Hackers have discovered that one of the most central elements of online security — the mobile phone number — is also one of the easiest to steal.

In a growing number of online attacks, hackers have been calling up Verizon, T-Mobile U.S., Sprint and AT&T and asking them to transfer control of a victim’s phone number to a device under the control of the hackers.

Once they get control of the phone number, they can reset the passwords on every account that uses the phone number as a security backup — such as Google, Twitter and Facebook.

“My iPad restarted, my phone restarted and my computer restarted, and that’s when I got the cold sweat and was like, ‘O.K., this is really serious,’” said Chris Burniske, a virtual currency investor who lost control of his phone number late last year.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/21/business/dealbook/phone-hack-bitcoin-virtual-currency.html


Here's a good editorial on the subject:

The author mentions a case when hackers made 13 requests to transfer a phone number and the cell carrier did NOTHING about it.

http://www.market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=232377
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Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on September 14, 2017, 01:50:34 AM »
I had an iPhone 4 up until this summer so dont feel bad. It still works even now. The only reason I stopped using it as I could not install anything and the OS could not be upgraded. It was retired in place. Went to a Samsung S7 Galaxy Edge, hated it and went back to the iPhone. I have now have an iPhone 7. If I get 4 years out of it I will be happy.

As for the spam numbers there really is nothing you can do. Generally speaking if you are not in my contacts I wont answer the phone. On an iPhone one tap of the power button silences the phone, two taps send it right to voice mail.

I have found something that seems to help. I answer the phone but dont talk and put it on speaker and mute. Than I just leave the line open. Computers hang up eventually and users just go hello, hello, hello. Some go nuts. I just leave em hanging till they hang up.

I have noticed that if you do this enough and they remove you from their dial patterns as you are tying up the line.
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FTE, Job and Career Discussion / Re: AI and Robotics: new opportunity areas?
« Last post by JoFrance on September 12, 2017, 03:10:27 PM »
Japan is doing a lot of interesting work with humanoids that will become care givers to their older population.  I sure wouldn't mind having a robot around the house when I'm too old to do a lot of things.

https://www.cbsnews.com/videos/cbsn-on-assignment-explores-japans-future-of-humanoid-robots/

There is a definite need for this technology in Japan and also, as the Boomer generation gets older, we will have the same need here.

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Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by JoFrance on September 12, 2017, 02:47:33 PM »
Geez, its frustrating that there really is no good solution.  I've gotten occasional spam texts, but its nothing like the phone calls.  I don't think personal phone calls will ever go away.  I know I can burn up the phone lines talking to my friends and family.

I'm going to look into Mr. Number.  If I can block most out of state numbers it would be a help.
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Discussions - Public / Re: How do you stop spam phonecalls?
« Last post by benali72 on September 12, 2017, 02:39:01 PM »
Indeed, the old system of telephone and POTS phone numbers are now almost completely devoid of trust.

Excellent summary of the problem. 

I have quite a few friends who don't even answer their phones anymore.

If you want to talk with them, you have to leave a message, and they call you back.

(of course, that's assuming you will answer when they call you back! otherwise you get an endless loop of phone messages!)
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