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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on April 25, 2017, 10:25:32 AM »
I also had a Canon G9 which was like point and shoot on steroids. I had the controls of a DSLR but was a little bigger than a point and shoot. I took that camera everywhere because it was compact and no fuss. I was thrilled with it till the day the lens jammed open. Apparently all these cameras that have these motorized lenses tend to suck in dirt and dust as it acts like a bellows. People suggested that I push the lens hard and sure enough it worked again. But after that I sold it.

I own the Canon G16 which is my primary shooter currently. Best $400 I spent in the last 10 years. It's got the spirit of classic Leicas or vintage rangefinders and feels like a nice little brick in the hands. Fully manual controls if you want that and variations like aperture or shutter speed priority. It has built in HDR mode which really doesn't look much different than normal images. Even a full hot shoe. 3K x 4K images.

The one feature that the G16 lacks that earlier Powershot G-series had was the articulateable back display. The back display is fixed like any other camera. Not a huge loss but shooting in crowds, like the Trump rally I went to last summer, I really could have used that for taking pictures overhead. Instead I had to guess but it turned out OK.

The G16 is a very nice camera and was the successor to my G9. The Canon G series are made like little metal bricks. You can get really nice pics out of them. My G9 would get sluggish when the light got dim, not so much on the new ones.

I have contemplated selling my DSLR multiple times or upgrading. I am still on the fence - the big thing is I hate carrying it. Its just bulky and gets in the way unlike my G9. But once you shoot with it, there is no going back. The controls and response are instantaneous but who likes carrying it.

I have contemplated getting a Canon G7X MKII - it has a bigger sensor and is much quicker than my G9. And the screen articulates and has a fast lens. But its not cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/Canon-PowerShot-G7-Mark-Black/dp/B01BV14OXA
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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by The Gorn on April 25, 2017, 09:24:17 AM »
This thread shows how autism can be harnessed for productive purposes. Not just weaponized in the name of Kek.

The general idea I'm following here is that anything that you do that is highly technical and time absorbing makes you autistic.

We beat swords into plowshares around here.
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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by The Gorn on April 25, 2017, 09:23:04 AM »
I also had a Canon G9 which was like point and shoot on steroids. I had the controls of a DSLR but was a little bigger than a point and shoot. I took that camera everywhere because it was compact and no fuss. I was thrilled with it till the day the lens jammed open. Apparently all these cameras that have these motorized lenses tend to suck in dirt and dust as it acts like a bellows. People suggested that I push the lens hard and sure enough it worked again. But after that I sold it.

I own the Canon G16 which is my primary shooter currently. Best $400 I spent in the last 10 years. It's got the spirit of classic Leicas or vintage rangefinders and feels like a nice little brick in the hands. Fully manual controls if you want that and variations like aperture or shutter speed priority. It has built in HDR mode which really doesn't look much different than normal images. Even a full hot shoe. 3K x 4K images.

The one feature that the G16 lacks that earlier Powershot G-series had was the articulateable back display. The back display is fixed like any other camera. Not a huge loss but shooting in crowds, like the Trump rally I went to last summer, I really could have used that for taking pictures overhead. Instead I had to guess but it turned out OK.
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Any time you log in to anything -- Google, FB, Link -- you're asking to be tracked and have all your behaviorial data sold to any company that will pay. Why wouldn't that include employers and potential employers?

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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by Code Refugee on April 25, 2017, 07:21:03 AM »
And what's the ARM board you're using?

One of these.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/pi-zero/

See that connector on the right? It's an industry standard high speed parallel bus camera connector. This board cost $5 (plus shipping, it's a trap). And like $28 more for a 128GB flash drive, or $7 for a 32GB etc. There's a new $10 board out that has bluetooth and wireless. I'll upgrade to that at some point and have it pretend to be a router so any browser nearby can simply log on and do photo management and editing, add bluetooth file transfer etc.

So you can see this is even easier than you might imagine. You have a Linux computer that you can run anything you want on, along with a bunch of i/o pins you can connect light sensors, tiny LCD screens, buttons, and even analog knobs to to make any kind of device you want. This board is like 2 inches wide, smaller than a pack of gum, weighs a fraction of an ounce, and can run for a long time off a battery.

So did you actually buy something sort of like this module?

https://www.amazon.com/Arducam-Megapixels-Sensor-OV5647-Raspberry/dp/B012V1HEP4

(contains that sensor.)

Not that one but pretty close. The default ribbon they come with is wider than with the tiny board so you need to make sure the ribbon is attached with a connector and not soldered on, and you need to get a reducing ribbon. Some people sell cases for this thing with a mount for the camera board, a reducing ribbon, and a hole for the camera. Those run about $6. But if you want to add knobs and a little screen and such you're better of 3D printing your own enclosure, starting with their case design and then making changes to add the extra features.

They have newer sensors with higher resolution and sony lenses. This was an old board and cheap from a chinese street stall. Easy enough to upgrade when I want, just swap in a new board. There's also camera modules available with high performance night vision stuff that I'll probably play with.

Anyway for $20-$50 or so you can have total control over how your camera works. These lenses and the processors that come with them are the same thing widely used in cell phones and its all fairly standardized and there's libraries to do all the basic access so I control it by calling command line functions, or python libraries for doing stuff like taking low level manual control of the shutter speed, white balance, etc. The chip it comes with has modes where everything it is done automatically, but you can override that and control all the parameters manually, which cell phones generally don't let you do.
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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by ilconsiglliere on April 25, 2017, 06:41:52 AM »
Interesting stuff, I didnt know you could even do this. But I guess it makes sense as camers today are basically little computers with a lens.

So are you more into the picture taking or the playing with the camera itself. I have noticed camera buffs are usually into one or the other. For some its all about the picture taking while for others its all about the camera equipment along with the pixel peeping that goes along with it.

I have been a long time Canon EOS user since film. I have a Canon EOS T2i Rebel, its about 6 years old now. It still takes great pictures because of the size of the sensor and the speed of the camera. I have 3 other lenses including an ultra wide, a longer zoom and a macro lens. I prefer taking pictures of nature, landscapes and people. The only thing that I have never cared for was the weight of the DSLR. It is a bulky thing even though the Canon Rebels are relatively small compared to their semi-pro models. But that being said the pics it takes are amazing even being 6 years old. You cant beat the speed and responsiveness of a DSLR.

I also had micro 4/3s at one point by Panasonic. Never cared for it and sold it.

I also had a Canon G9 which was like point and shoot on steroids. I had the controls of a DSLR but was a little bigger than a point and shoot. I took that camera everywhere because it was compact and no fuss. I was thrilled with it till the day the lens jammed open. Apparently all these cameras that have these motorized lenses tend to suck in dirt and dust as it acts like a bellows. People suggested that I push the lens hard and sure enough it worked again. But after that I sold it.

I also have the Canon EOS M series of cameras. I bought these as they have the same sensor as DSLR but are small. The problem is they tend to be sluggish and very fiddly. Didnt care for them either and am probably going to sell them.

Truthfully though I use my iphone more than anything now as its with me all the time. I can just whip it out and take a picture. Some of the phone apps are pretty sophisticated now and you can control aperture, shutter, film speed and more. My iphone is 6 years old and its ok but the newer iphones and samsungs take amazing pictures. 
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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by The Gorn on April 24, 2017, 04:56:06 PM »
So did you actually buy something sort of like this module?

https://www.amazon.com/Arducam-Megapixels-Sensor-OV5647-Raspberry/dp/B012V1HEP4

(contains that sensor.)

And what's the ARM board you're using?

You'll learn a heck of a lot, that's for certain.
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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by The Gorn on April 24, 2017, 04:53:40 PM »
So, the lens won't be anything special, and neither will the resolution. But - you have the opportunity to create real time photography solutions.

So I can think of one mini-project I would take on with such a setup:

Look into High Dynamic Range or HDR photography. Multiple exposures are taken of a high-contrast subject, and the images are processed individually and then merged back together into a final image that shows detail in all aspects, highlights and shadows.

The most dramatic HDR images look like solarization has been applied even though it hasn't.

So, you can readily create an app on your setup that takes HDR images.

HDR is big with urban explorer types and architecture photographers.
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Discussions - Public / Re: camera experiments
« Last post by Code Refugee on April 24, 2017, 02:54:52 PM »
Yeah that's pretty much it! :)

It'll be really cool if I can get to the point where I can take photos of the same quality as I did with chemical film. I'm pretty sure I won't be able to, but it's fun to fiddle with nonetheless, which is pretty much how I got into photos back in the day anyway, fiddling.

edit: this is the sensor I'm using:

http://docs-europe.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/11d1/0900766b811d1155.pdf

Released in 2009. I realize it's now "obsolete". I bought it a few months ago for around $7. Did the interfacing myself using the datasheet. I have a lot of control.
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