Author Topic: Unteachable Ignorance  (Read 317 times)

TechTalk

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Re: Unteachable Ignorance
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2017, 08:18:05 AM »
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They weed out most of the people out there as they are not able to think in terms of return on investment.

It often can be difficult to prove what the "return on investment" will be. That said, in the example that I used, a retail or service based company simply cannot function very well (if at all) without the computer hardware and software. In this case, a good salesperson might stress the features and benefits that the new system would provide instead of ROI.

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But, to the regular "tire kicker", the sticker shock is just part of the interaction and why it is best to keep the interaction short.

From a sales perspective, I somewhat agree. I believe a good sales person should spend the time to find out why "tire kicker" is currently kicking tires (e.g. possible future business expansion, current system no longer meets their needs, etc.).

This is where the ignorance comes into play.  A decision maker rarely knows what their technology options are and a sales person or a particular vendor is rarely going to provide that type of information to them (that is assuming they themselves even know what the various options if any are).

In the example that I used a company could either:
• Do nothing at this time.
• Purchase a commercial software product that does NOT meet all of their needs but is the cheapest option.
• Purchase a commercial software product and then pay more money to have it tweaked/customized.
• Pay even more money to have something that is custom built from the ground up.

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Re: Unteachable Ignorance
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2017, 08:53:49 AM »
To get this interesting tangent back to the original example of the Craigslist ad, that guy displayed an interesting pair of characteristics:

1) Completely sold on the value of the possible solution.
2) But profoundly in the reasoning mode of a custom solution being a commodity.

So he displays attributes from opposite ends of the spectrum.

That is extremely  common with small businesses fishing for technology service bargains. There's no real way to work with that. He's another tire-kicker.

Finally, there's a saying "you can't cheat an honest man." I've seen this play out in real life, multiple times.

I expect that if anyone succeeds in doing business with this person, it will be a con-artist who tells the advertiser whatever he wants to hear and (for instance) uses some cheap Indians to build a mock-up that appears to work... and takes the money and disappears.

You could probably drive a simulation "Mechanical Turk" wise to appear to be a small trading system.

Someone will lie to the guy, tell him what he blindly wants to hear, and extract a few thousand from him. I've seen that happen very often to unknowledgeable but pompous and arrogant small business types who want the world for a few thousands.
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Re: Unteachable Ignorance
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2017, 07:20:28 AM »
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To get this interesting tangent back to the original example of the Craigslist ad

From an economic or business perspective it sort of is related in that creating a unique software program or software system for a particular customer is typically going to be very expensive. That said, I can see why you mentioned the word tangent because my example talked about aging technology which becomes obsolete over time and how the costs of replacing existing software must also eventually be taken into account.

Generally speaking, it is only economically beneficial to pay for unique or custom made software if that software genuinely aids that customer in differentiating themselves from their competitors in the marketplace. The problem with a Craigslist ad is that it is often anonymous. For all we know, this particular person could have alternative motives for posting that ad (e.g. a recruiter who is fishing for some talent or another programmer interested in checking out some of his competition). The software market is global nowadays, so maybe this guy has posted elsewhere online as well.