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Main Category => Discussions - Public => Topic started by: benali72 on November 26, 2017, 10:29:55 PM

Title: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: benali72 on November 26, 2017, 10:29:55 PM
I see Home Depot offers 8 LED 60-watt-equivalent bulbs for only $10. Either in Bright or Soft versions. They consume only 8.5 watts each. Finally! Looks like led bulbs have arrived for general use. I'm very happy with them and have replaced all my CFL 60-watt-equivalents with them. Nice!
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on November 26, 2017, 11:04:19 PM
The only big question being, do they last? Occasionally we have LED bulbs on strands of Christmas lights go dark. But 1.25 apiece for a light bulb that easily outperforms incandescents is really not bad.

I assume that LEDs have far fewer toxic nasty elements in them and far lesser risk issues than CFLs. LEDs can only be an improvement over CFLs.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: pxsant on November 27, 2017, 03:19:18 AM
I have been using LED bulbs for several years.   I don't have a single CF or incandescent in the house.  A year or so ago Home Depot had a special sale on LED bulbs for about 80% off (somewhere around $2.50) so I bought a couple of  dozen.   I installed about half in my daughter's house.  In the past couple of years I have only had one bulb fail.  At 8 watts, can't go wrong.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: unix on November 27, 2017, 05:37:11 AM
The Costco brand, Feit is apparently troublesome. Amazon reviews are at 3.5 stars. Home Depot brand is nicer. I got the 100w replacement - nice.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: benali72 on November 27, 2017, 09:43:09 AM
Hey all, thank guys for the brand information. I've been wondering how long these things will last. I still remember when CFLs first came out, the market was flooded with cheap Chinese made ones, some of which burned out way faster than was claimed. I bought my LEDs at Home Depot so hopefully I get the same good results as pxsand and unix.

I love the fact they eliminate the environmental disaster of CFLs-- I mean seriously, who could really follow all those disposal requirements all the time.

Plus the LEDs don't get hot beneath small lampshades, so you can put a 75 or 100 equivalent in a 60-watt rated device without worries. Fantastic. Cheers.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on November 27, 2017, 02:11:37 PM
We had a motion sensor coach light next to our garage's door go out this summer so we bought a replacement my wife fell in love with. When I went to install it, much to my chagrin it had a self contained LED light in it. I wouldn't have gotten it if I'd known but we kept it and I installed it and caulked it in.

The motion part doesn't work very well so we leave the light on so it stays on all night. It's as bright as a 100 watt bulb yet when I touch the LED light inside the shade it's barely warm.

Almost 100% efficiency in converting electricity to light, QUITE impressive. Even CFLs get pretty hot.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 01, 2017, 10:30:56 AM
I just installed LED recessed lighting in my kitchen. I ripped out the entire ceiling and put in recessed HALO lighting cans. I did not pick LED only cans but rather cans that were capable of taking regular bulbs, LED bulbs or LED recessed lighting modules. Than I put the sheet rock back. Came out pretty nice. My family was in construction so this kind of work does not scare me and I have done it before. This is my first time using LED's.

My recessed lighting LED modules were made by HALO who makes the majority of recessed cans on the market. They are not like bulbs at all - they are more like hockey pucks with a built in trim ring. The whole module screws into a standard Edison socket.  Here is what I put in:

http://www.cooperindustries.com/content/public/en/lighting/brands/recessed_halo/_led_retrofit.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDmlhcGwPJo

There are a few things I like - they dont barely consume any electricity and they also dont generate heat. This is a very good thing as most recessed lights generate a ton of heat. I did a cost analysis - trim ring + LED flood light bulb was more expensive than buying these modules from HALO. So I gave it a shot.

We shall see how long they last. I am usually not an early adopter and wait for the price to come down. The prices of LEDs are coming down like a rock. I was disappointed with the CFL bulbs - none lasted as long as they said it would.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 01, 2017, 11:20:55 AM
I just installed LED recessed lighting in my kitchen.
....
We shall see how long they last. I am usually not an early adopter and wait for the price to come down. The prices of LEDs are coming down like a rock. I was disappointed with the CFL bulbs - none lasted as long as they said it would.

Niiiiiice. Thanks for the mini-review.

We have can lights in the kitchen that were installed in 2000, and in 2007 our contractor poured extra insulation in the attic. So there is one can light apparently covered in batting up above that from time to time goes out (thermal safety shutdown) right over where I cook.

Are LED lights capable of dimming?

I wonder if LEDs actually appropriated alien technology? I'm wondering. :D They seem a little too good to be true.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 01, 2017, 04:51:42 PM
I just installed LED recessed lighting in my kitchen.
....
We shall see how long they last. I am usually not an early adopter and wait for the price to come down. The prices of LEDs are coming down like a rock. I was disappointed with the CFL bulbs - none lasted as long as they said it would.

Niiiiiice. Thanks for the mini-review.

We have can lights in the kitchen that were installed in 2000, and in 2007 our contractor poured extra insulation in the attic. So there is one can light apparently covered in batting up above that from time to time goes out (thermal safety shutdown) right over where I cook.

Are LED lights capable of dimming?

I wonder if LEDs actually appropriated alien technology? I'm wondering. :D They seem a little too good to be true.

You mentioned that the thermal overload kicks in on the can. You may know this but there are IC (insulation contact) and non-IC (non insulation contact cans). IC cans are designed to be in contact with insulation and behave normally. NON-IC cans are designed to NOT be in contact with insulation. If the non-IC can comes in contact with insulation you can have a fire. Most cans have thermal overload protection to prevent the fire but you should check it. If its a non-IC can you should replace the can with an IC can or move the insulation away from it.

Also they are now making sealed cans so you don't  loose your heat or cooling up through the can. The bottom of the can has a rubber seal that goes tight against the sheetrock. I put in sealed cans even though I have another floor above.

Yes LEDs can be dimmed but not all of them. You have to read the side of the box, they usually say it outright whether they can be dimmed.

The one thing you do need is a dimmer that is capable of controlling LEDs. They have to be reverse or forward cut phase dimmers. I used this one:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lutron-Toggler-150-Watt-Single-Pole-3-Way-CFL-LED-Dimmer-White-TGCL-153PH-WH/202746671

The little tab/slot on the side next to the switch is the dimmer. Whats nice about these is they use standard wall plates. Works fine. If you don't use the right one you can get some weirdness with the LEDs:

https://insights.regencylighting.com/heres-an-overview-of-common-led-dimming-issues-and-how-to-fix-them
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 01, 2017, 11:18:24 PM
You mentioned that the thermal overload kicks in on the can. You may know this but there are IC (insulation contact) and non-IC (non insulation contact cans). IC cans are designed to be in contact with insulation and behave normally. NON-IC cans are designed to NOT be in contact with insulation. If the non-IC can comes in contact with insulation you can have a fire. Most cans have thermal overload protection to prevent the fire but you should check it. If its a non-IC can you should replace the can with an IC can or move the insulation away from it.

Thanks for the tip. One contractor installed the cans in 2000 and he was a dipshit I lost contact with, another did the insulation in 2007 and I maintain his website. I should ask him about this.

Although, if I installed LED bulbs into those cans the heat issue would be pretty much moot.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 02, 2017, 02:02:14 AM
You mentioned that the thermal overload kicks in on the can. You may know this but there are IC (insulation contact) and non-IC (non insulation contact cans). IC cans are designed to be in contact with insulation and behave normally. NON-IC cans are designed to NOT be in contact with insulation. If the non-IC can comes in contact with insulation you can have a fire. Most cans have thermal overload protection to prevent the fire but you should check it. If its a non-IC can you should replace the can with an IC can or move the insulation away from it.

Thanks for the tip. One contractor installed the cans in 2000 and he was a dipshit I lost contact with, another did the insulation in 2007 and I maintain his website. I should ask him about this.

Although, if I installed LED bulbs into those cans the heat issue would be pretty much moot.

Yep, with the LEDs the heat goes away. Even when on for a while they are just luke warm to the touch. Halo has these LEDs that install into a regular junction box, you don't even need the can. Thats how cool these things are.

http://www.cooperindustries.com/content/public/en/lighting/products/recessed_general_purpose_downlighting/led/_6_inch_led_smd6/_889910.html

I should have been an electrician ;) .
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 02, 2017, 08:50:36 AM
I love electrical work:

- Doing your own wiring inspires awe. Normies are scared shitless by electrical work. Nobody in the general population understands electricity.

- No water pressure or drainage to deal with and usually no leaks (grounding issues aside.) Electric is really clean to deal with. It's either: powering something; disconnected entirely; or shorting out.

It's really satisfying to buy a box of Romex for $30-100, a new breaker, and a utility box, and a few hours later you have a new outlet in your house that would have cost $300+ for an electrician to run.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: benali72 on December 02, 2017, 02:34:23 PM
Gorn and Ilconsigliere -- I only wish I had your electrical talents. I hope to evolve to your level one day where I won't be paying through the nose for something I could have done myself.

Meanwhile -- I noticed that the new 60-watt-equivalent Ecosmart LEDs I bought from Home Depot are way brighter than the Ecosmart 60-watt-equivalent CFLs I have.

I looked at the lumens, and the brighter bulbs actually have less lumens than the dimmer ones (840 vs 900)!  Say what?  I thought lumens were supposed to be the measure of how bright the bulb is.

Then I discovered that the Kelvin "color temperature" is the definitive factor in my case.

The bulbs with the higher Kelvin CT seem much brighter than those with lower KCT (5500 vs 2700), even tho they have less lumens!

I never knew to look at this before. I incorrectly thought it was all about lumens and incandescent-watt-equivalents.

KCT chart and explanation -- www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html (http://www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html)
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 03, 2017, 03:53:12 PM
Gorn and Ilconsigliere -- I only wish I had your electrical talents. I hope to evolve to your level one day where I won't be paying through the nose for something I could have done myself.

Meanwhile -- I noticed that the new 60-watt-equivalent Ecosmart LEDs I bought from Home Depot are way brighter than the Ecosmart 60-watt-equivalent CFLs I have.

I looked at the lumens, and the brighter bulbs actually have less lumens than the dimmer ones (840 vs 900)!  Say what?  I thought lumens were supposed to be the measure of how bright the bulb is.

Then I discovered that the Kelvin "color temperature" is the definitive factor in my case.

The bulbs with the higher Kelvin CT seem much brighter than those with lower KCT (5500 vs 2700), even tho they have less lumens!

I never knew to look at this before. I incorrectly thought it was all about lumens and incandescent-watt-equivalents.

KCT chart and explanation -- www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html (http://www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html)

Its not hard to pick it up. I know you can do it as you are smart. I knew a lot of it from years and years of being around it but there is stuff I didn't know so I got this book many years ago:

Electrical Wiring Residential by Ray C. Mullin.

This is the book that electricians learn from in school. If you buy it new its like $100+ but you can get a copy off of Ebay for $10. No joke. You don't need the latest one which has all the current electrical codes. The codes keep changing all the time. Any book from the last 10 years is good enough. As LEDs are evolving so rapidly they are not typically in the book anyway.

Yes Lumens is a funny thing. I have seen the same thing myself. Kelvin measures the color temperature of the light I typically try to install recessed lights of about 3500-4000 kelvin. To low a temperature the color of the light is more golden, to bright of a temperature - like 5000-6000 its very harsh bright bluefish light.

You can see the color of the light in this picture:

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0385/4061/articles/KELVIN_COLOR_TEMPERATURE_RANGE.jpg?v=1511386996)
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 03, 2017, 05:02:00 PM
Quote from: Benali72
I only wish I had your electrical talents.

Household electrical work doesn't demand any real talents. It's all rote, easily learned principles. And not that many principles and ideas.  If you're an IT or engineering graduate it is 1/1000 of the rigor of technology work.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: benali72 on December 03, 2017, 08:53:49 PM
Thanks Ilconsigliere for the lead on the book. I'm going to get it. And thanks to you and Gorn both for the confidence. I'm gonna start learning this stuff.

Meanwhile, here's a socket I need to fix right now.   Let me see....

ZZZzzZZZZZzzZZZ  !!!!!! 

Oops, I guess I better read the book first.   :P
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 03, 2017, 08:57:45 PM
ZZZzzZZZZZzzZZZ  !!!!!! 

Lesson 1: FIGURE OUT WHICH OUTLETS GO TO WHICH CIRCUIT BREAKERS BY FLIPPING BREAKERS AND ASKING SOMEONE ELSE TO TELL YOU WHICH LIGHTS GO OUT.

Lesson 2: TURN OF THAT OUTLET'S BREAKER.

But you knew all of that, right?  :P  :D

(There is no better approach with old wiring than #1. #2 is a useful survival tactic.)

I highly recommend searching Youtube videos for explainer videos.

You know... Youtube, the deep-state-tracked privacy violating platform that anticipates your very lifestyle. (sorry  :P)

I ALWAYS look for Youtube videos any more when tacking a home project. Seriously.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 04, 2017, 04:59:07 AM
ZZZzzZZZZZzzZZZ  !!!!!! 

Lesson 1: FIGURE OUT WHICH OUTLETS GO TO WHICH CIRCUIT BREAKERS BY FLIPPING BREAKERS AND ASKING SOMEONE ELSE TO TELL YOU WHICH LIGHTS GO OUT.

Lesson 2: TURN OF THAT OUTLET'S BREAKER.

But you knew all of that, right?  :P  :D

(There is no better approach with old wiring than #1. #2 is a useful survival tactic.)

I highly recommend searching Youtube videos for explainer videos.

You know... Youtube, the deep-state-tracked privacy violating platform that anticipates your very lifestyle. (sorry  :P)

I ALWAYS look for Youtube videos any more when tacking a home project. Seriously.

I second what Gorn wrote but I also recommend you get a non-contact voltage tester like this:

http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/electrical-testers/non-contact-voltage-tester

They are dirt cheap ($16) and you can test before you touch it. You just have to put it near it and it chirps. All the electricians use them. The reason I tell you to get this is because sometimes stuff is crosswired. You would be shocked at what people do - you turned it off and thought it wasnt hot any longer and surprise!

On certain things I will turn off the main to the house, than you know its not on.

Certain things I wont do which is messing with the main into the house. Everything else I will do. Just make sure you follow safety practices and it will be ok.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 04, 2017, 05:00:35 AM
Quote from: Benali72
I only wish I had your electrical talents.

Household electrical work doesn't demand any real talents. It's all rote, easily learned principles. And not that many principles and ideas.  If you're an IT or engineering graduate it is 1/1000 of the rigor of technology work.

I disagree about the talents - a lot of electrical work has to do with experience. There is the easy way and the hard way to do things. Do to experience electricians know the easy way ;) .

But I do agree that its far easier than IT. AT the end of the day an electrician goes home without being on call and having to worry about being laid off.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 04, 2017, 05:03:40 AM
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Electrical-Wiring-Residential-by-Mullin/231299832218?epid=60056480&hash=item35da8b599a:g:cvIAAOSwOt9Zg1YY
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 04, 2017, 06:53:44 AM
About not needing talents, I meant that there's no natural inborn inclination to perform electrical work. Well, with the exception of having logic and being able to follow instructions and general principles.

IE, you don't have to be an aspie to do competent electrical work, unlike IT, and it probably doesn't even help. ;)
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 04, 2017, 11:57:07 AM
About not needing talents, I meant that there's no natural inborn inclination to perform electrical work. Well, with the exception of having logic and being able to follow instructions and general principles.

IE, you don't have to be an aspie to do competent electrical work, unlike IT, and it probably doesn't even help. ;)

I understand what you mean, its not art or creativity we are talking about. Though I have to say I have seen some hairy stuff with electricity that requires you to have intelligence. Maybe not aspie IT tard intelligence but intelligence just the same.

My sister had a whole house generator installed - 20kW that ran off natural gas. Has a full blown automatic transfer switch. You lose power, it counts to 10 and than fires up the generator by itself. Power comes back, it hangs on for like 2 minutes than switches back.

The amount of engineering between the gas and power lines was significant. Definitely not a trivial project for someone who just is an electrician dabbler like yours truly. 
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: The Gorn on December 04, 2017, 02:03:23 PM
I can respect that kind of setup. I'd love to have it but can't justify that kind of upfront cost.

Offhand, I'd say that you're rerouting the main power through the gen set's utility box/switchover box.

The house power in a circuit breaker box is a couple of bus bars behind the breakers against the back of the box.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: unix on December 04, 2017, 02:47:58 PM
Gorn and Ilconsigliere -- I only wish I had your electrical talents. I hope to evolve to your level one day where I won't be paying through the nose for something I could have done myself.

Meanwhile -- I noticed that the new 60-watt-equivalent Ecosmart LEDs I bought from Home Depot are way brighter than the Ecosmart 60-watt-equivalent CFLs I have.

I looked at the lumens, and the brighter bulbs actually have less lumens than the dimmer ones (840 vs 900)!  Say what?  I thought lumens were supposed to be the measure of how bright the bulb is.

Then I discovered that the Kelvin "color temperature" is the definitive factor in my case.

The bulbs with the higher Kelvin CT seem much brighter than those with lower KCT (5500 vs 2700), even tho they have less lumens!

I never knew to look at this before. I incorrectly thought it was all about lumens and incandescent-watt-equivalents.

KCT chart and explanation -- www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html (http://www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html)

Its not hard to pick it up. I know you can do it as you are smart. I knew a lot of it from years and years of being around it but there is stuff I didn't know so I got this book many years ago:

Electrical Wiring Residential by Ray C. Mullin.

This is the book that electricians learn from in school. If you buy it new its like $100+ but you can get a copy off of Ebay for $10. No joke. You don't need the latest one which has all the current electrical codes. The codes keep changing all the time. Any book from the last 10 years is good enough. As LEDs are evolving so rapidly they are not typically in the book anyway.

Yes Lumens is a funny thing. I have seen the same thing myself. Kelvin measures the color temperature of the light I typically try to install recessed lights of about 3500-4000 kelvin. To low a temperature the color of the light is more golden, to bright of a temperature - like 5000-6000 its very harsh bright bluefish light.

You can see the color of the light in this picture:

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0385/4061/articles/KELVIN_COLOR_TEMPERATURE_RANGE.jpg?v=1511386996)



This is very cool. I buy around 5000K. I think sunlight is 3500K or so. I've noticed that all things being equal, 5500K and above actually generates more lumens  - given the same Amps, the same everything but the color rendition really sucks.

I visited this local battery store, they happened to have some unusual LED bulbs. I got this weird green bulb on sale.   For the X-mas season. Consumes just a few bucks annually.  It's actually bright green neon type green, very light green, closer to white really than to green.


There is something about the design of the LED where they emit more lumens in the white to blue spectrum. And are less efficient in the 3500K spectrum.



Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 05, 2017, 04:45:51 PM
I can respect that kind of setup. I'd love to have it but can't justify that kind of upfront cost.

Offhand, I'd say that you're rerouting the main power through the gen set's utility box/switchover box.

The house power in a circuit breaker box is a couple of bus bars behind the breakers against the back of the box.

It was pricey - like $9k and $5K of that was for the generator, the transfer switch was like $600 by itself. Here in the people's republic of NJ it would have been even more except the electrician is pals with her husband so they got hooked up. My sister didn't have power for 14 days during Sandy and they now have an elderly person living with them that has stuff that requires power. That is why she got it. It will help on the resale of the house if someday she sells it.

The installation is hairy - the intelligent transfer switch is like 3 feet tall and 1 1/2 feet wide, bolted to the outside of the house. There is a lot stuff in it - more than I would have thought. Both the main from the electric company and power supply from the generator comes into it and it monitors the power supply coming into the house. If the power drops it automatically switches over and starts the generator. You can over ride it of course and make it flip back and forth.

The gas main is 2 inches in diameter into the generator which required a whole lot of piping. She was fortunate because her gas and electric are in the same corner of the basement where all the utilities come in. So the plumber and electrician didn't have to run new wire and pipe across the basement.

My friend when he saw it asked if we had a bunker in the yard ;)  - are you building za rockets, das good?
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: ilconsiglliere on December 05, 2017, 04:49:30 PM
Gorn and Ilconsigliere -- I only wish I had your electrical talents. I hope to evolve to your level one day where I won't be paying through the nose for something I could have done myself.

Meanwhile -- I noticed that the new 60-watt-equivalent Ecosmart LEDs I bought from Home Depot are way brighter than the Ecosmart 60-watt-equivalent CFLs I have.

I looked at the lumens, and the brighter bulbs actually have less lumens than the dimmer ones (840 vs 900)!  Say what?  I thought lumens were supposed to be the measure of how bright the bulb is.

Then I discovered that the Kelvin "color temperature" is the definitive factor in my case.

The bulbs with the higher Kelvin CT seem much brighter than those with lower KCT (5500 vs 2700), even tho they have less lumens!

I never knew to look at this before. I incorrectly thought it was all about lumens and incandescent-watt-equivalents.

KCT chart and explanation -- www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html (http://www.lumens.com/how-tos-and-advice/kelvin-color-temperature.html)

Its not hard to pick it up. I know you can do it as you are smart. I knew a lot of it from years and years of being around it but there is stuff I didn't know so I got this book many years ago:

Electrical Wiring Residential by Ray C. Mullin.

This is the book that electricians learn from in school. If you buy it new its like $100+ but you can get a copy off of Ebay for $10. No joke. You don't need the latest one which has all the current electrical codes. The codes keep changing all the time. Any book from the last 10 years is good enough. As LEDs are evolving so rapidly they are not typically in the book anyway.

Yes Lumens is a funny thing. I have seen the same thing myself. Kelvin measures the color temperature of the light I typically try to install recessed lights of about 3500-4000 kelvin. To low a temperature the color of the light is more golden, to bright of a temperature - like 5000-6000 its very harsh bright bluefish light.

You can see the color of the light in this picture:

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0385/4061/articles/KELVIN_COLOR_TEMPERATURE_RANGE.jpg?v=1511386996)



This is very cool. I buy around 5000K. I think sunlight is 3500K or so. I've noticed that all things being equal, 5500K and above actually generates more lumens  - given the same Amps, the same everything but the color rendition really sucks.

I visited this local battery store, they happened to have some unusual LED bulbs. I got this weird green bulb on sale.   For the X-mas season. Consumes just a few bucks annually.  It's actually bright green neon type green, very light green, closer to white really than to green.


There is something about the design of the LED where they emit more lumens in the white to blue spectrum. And are less efficient in the 3500K spectrum.

Yes it is interesting. I bought LEDs for the recessed lights that were in the 3500-4000K range. The the light is quite bright but its not harsh, it looks very natural and color rendition looks normal.

From what I know LEDs are a type of semi-conductor so it might have to do with the manufacturing aspect of the silicon.
Title: Re: LED light bulbs are finally here!
Post by: unix on December 06, 2017, 08:27:09 AM
Actually LEDs do get hot but the heat is internal. It is not emitted forward with the light. I have a few custom torches that run well above 1000 lumens - sustained - and the essential component in the design is the heat sink. The flashlights have heavy brass or copper heatsinks. Cheaper Chiniese bulbs or torches vastly overstate lumens. They may generate 2000 lumens for 2 minutes and then drop to 800.

Heat is actually a serious problem with LEDS once you get above 800 lumens or so.