Author Topic: Back up  (Read 371 times)

CodeRefugee

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Back up
« on: July 26, 2017, 12:00:59 PM »
Back up on the board. Lightning storm fried all my computers and my backup drives in one hit. Nice.

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Re: Back up
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2017, 12:04:24 PM »
Huh. Sorry to read that. That's a nightmare. How did your backup drives get hit? Were they plugged in?

We've been QUITE lucky in that regard. Although over the years I have lost a range hood style microwave oven, a portable phone, and the on-motherboard Ethernet interface on one computer from lightning. But not an entire computer or hard drive.

There is a forgot password function. I believe you had to verify your email address originally when you signed up, so it should still be good to recover your original account.
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Re: Back up
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2017, 12:26:25 PM »
Check your PM in box.
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Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2017, 01:34:23 PM »
Thanks!

Yeah weather channel had a thunderstorm warning so I went to back up and shut down. There was a hit outside the window that fried most electronic things. Cable modem survived, and stove clock, and a $25 R-Pi server!

I have multiple backups but all ones the last 5 yrs or so are mac disk format and my main laptop and desktop at home were mac.

Borrowed a windows laptop. Not sure I want to do mac again (expensive and 0 upgradable: ripoff!). Thinking of configuring a Ubuntu laptop.

unix

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Re: Back up
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2017, 02:42:02 PM »
I  got a motherboard fried once, power  surge, presumably due to lightning.
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Re: Back up
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2017, 04:25:35 PM »
A good online back up is a good idea.  It only backs up the data and you still have to recover but the data is all that matters.  Back ups should always be offsite.

Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2017, 04:45:28 PM »
I don't trust online.

I have mulitiple backups, just none of the hard drives can be read.

Apparently though Linux can read Mac drives. I'm trying to make a boot thumb now for this machine and then see what I can recover. A lot of stuff though even if I have the file its useless w/o buying another mac and I don't want to do that. Maybe I'll just change my name move to another state and start over.  :)

pxsant

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Re: Back up
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2017, 05:25:16 PM »
I have an IMAC my sone gave me.  The only thing I use it for is watching Netflix or Amazon movies and it does have a great screen for that.    I would not use it for anything critical - I just don't like the locked down nature of the Apple products.   Most of my work is done on Linux Mint but I also have several Windows laptops I primarily use for customer support.  When I do backups, I plug in an USB hard drive, do the backup and then remove the drive.    No risk of losing a backup with a power failure or lightning strike unless I really get unlcky and have that happen while doing a backup.

Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2017, 06:15:03 PM »
Tech notes:

1. running Ubuntu ISO image cloned to a thumb drive works
2. reports that Linux has Mac HFS+ drivers are correct. Can read, write, delete, move, empty trash

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Re: Back up
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2017, 06:33:34 PM »
In the future I would recommend keeping your logins and passwords in a Keepass encrypted file. Which you can save to a thumb drive and/or Dropbox - I know but the encryption is supposed to be mil-spec.

I'm paranoid about losing control of websites, domains, email addresses, logins for banks, deposit accounts with the state for my corporation...
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unix

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Re: Back up
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2017, 03:09:05 AM »
Tech notes:

1. running Ubuntu ISO image cloned to a thumb drive works
2. reports that Linux has Mac HFS+ drivers are correct. Can read, write, delete, move, empty trash

Well, this is very cool.

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Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2017, 03:57:09 AM »
In the future I would recommend keeping your logins and passwords in a Keepass encrypted file. Which you can save to a thumb drive and/or Dropbox - I know but the encryption is supposed to be mil-spec.

I'm paranoid about losing control of websites, domains, email addresses, logins for banks, deposit accounts with the state for my corporation...

I agree I need to come up with a better solution. I had paper notecards in a safe but with changing passwords regularly it was a hassle, I didn't keep it updated and I'm finding it is mostly obsolete. I might get a little recipe box like my mother once had though and use that method but keep up with it.

I assume all encryption is secretly broken. Having a digital master file on the net of all my aliases and bookstore accounts is too much risk for me.

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Re: Back up
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2017, 05:20:17 AM »
A note on encryption.

I use Evernote and encrypt all notes I put in.   The encryption key is never transmitted to Evernote or outside your system.  Evernote uses a AES-128 key.   Here is a description of AES-128 from Wikipedia.  Note that it would take billions of years to brute force break a 128 key so I don't worry about anybody accessding my encrypted notes.    AES-256 is approved by the US for storing top secret classified information.

"The design and strength of all key lengths of the AES algorithm (i.e., 128, 192 and 256) are sufficient to protect classified information up to the SECRET level. TOP SECRET information will require use of either the 192 or 256 key lengths. The implementation of AES in products intended to protect national security systems and/or information must be reviewed and certified by NSA prior to their acquisition and use.

A 126-bit key (instead of 128-bits) would still take billions of years to brute force on current and foreseeable hardware. Also, the authors calculate the best attack using their technique on AES with a 128 bit key requires storing 288 bits of data (though this has later been improved to 256,[28] which is 9 petabytes). That works out to about 38 trillion terabytes of data, which is more than all the data stored on all the computers on the planet in 2016. As such this is a seriously impractical attack which has no practical implication on AES security.[29]"

NOTE: - I would NEVER use any system that transmits or stores the encryption key on some server somewhere.

unix

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Re: Back up
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2017, 07:48:46 AM »
I use VeraCrypt... AES-256 bits piped into another encryption cycle like blowfish. 

I am not certain that encrypting it twice makes it stronger. Seems so on the surface but I am not a crypographer and intuition does not work in that field.

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Re: Back up
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2017, 08:52:57 AM »
I use VeraCrypt... AES-256 bits piped into another encryption cycle like blowfish. 

I am not certain that encrypting it twice makes it stronger. Seems so on the surface but I am not a crypographer and intuition does not work in that field.

Truecrypt (the original codebase of VeraCrypt) has a concept of a hidden volume... an encrypted volume inside another encrypted volume.

https://www.truecrypt71a.com/documentation/plausible-deniability/hidden-volume/

Is this what you're using when you said double encryption?

Hidden volumes sound like an ideal solution for ultimate security.
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