Author Topic: Back up  (Read 372 times)

unix

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Re: Back up
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2017, 09:03:27 PM »
I haven't explored the hidden volume feature yet.

When you do a conventional encryption, when you create a "volume", say specify your drive "X", it gives you a choice *how* you want to encrypt with what algorithm or a set of algorithms.

It also gives you a choice how you want to wipe the data. One pass, two or 3 or 5.

VeraCrypt does, not sure if TrueCrypt did.
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pxsant

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Re: Back up
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2017, 03:41:28 AM »
Unix as I understand it, you are first encrypting with VeraCrypt at AES-256 and then encrypting the already encrypted volume with another encrypting method.  Why???   If AES-256 is good enough for US top secret material, what are you doing the second encryption for?   If you ever have a problem you are going to play hell recovering double encrypted data.     You are again getting yourself in trouble by over thinking and over doing technical stuff.

I am honestly curious about your reasoning on this.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 03:54:11 AM by pxsant »

The Gorn

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Re: Back up
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2017, 07:37:58 AM »
If AES-256 is good enough for US top secret material, what are you doing the second encryption for?   

My sentiments exactly. The hidden volume capability of Truecrypt/Veracrypt allows the user to hide really important stuff in an inner encrypted volume that will escape detection. The hidden volume is "James Bond" stuff - avoiding detection through completely effective obscurity. It would be no harder than what he does now because it would require him to remember two passwords for each level which I assume he has to do with his current approach.
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Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2017, 07:46:34 AM »
Update.

Linux's support for HFS+ is very limited.

A HUGE problem is that most of the folders appear either as files of size 0, or as a folder with an X through its icon and double clicking gives some message like "inaccessible" with no explanation. So turns out I was able to access 0% of the info I needed. Even text files that I should have been able to read I couldn't get to because their hierarchy wasn't recognized.

If the drive is just media file backups and shallow directories though it's ok, but that drive wasn't the important one.

There's two paid HFS+ drivers for Windows I might try next.

I found Firefox in Ubuntu makes the laptop hot and fan run. Same laptop and version Firefox in Windows runs light. Ubuntu FF has real clunky scrolling. But nicer looking fonts than Windows.

Running the official Apache OpenOffice installer in Windows10 caused a kernel panic and damaged the hard drive. That sucked.

I have around 4 levels of backup, the most recent backup and original drive are fried and don't even show up as dead.

I have 2 more levels of backup. Secondary then 2-3 rotating copies at the lowest oldest leaf. Leafs I'd not been keeping up with so go back 2-5 yrs years as they are all super expensive Firewire drives that are now obsolete and hard to deal with. Secondary, USB2, though is only 7 wks old.

So 2 months lost only, not too bad.

Some newer site passwords lost but might be able to reset as I finally was able to view my encrypted local file off the secondary by borrowing a coworkers old MacBook they left in their office overnight.

I used to clone out to secondary after every project complete. Done about 4 projects the last 7 wks. Had gotten complacent with the primary thinking one backup is sort of ok. Wrong answer.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 08:27:34 AM by Code Refugee »

Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2017, 08:40:06 AM »
I dislike Windows10 Mail.

What do you guys use?

The Gorn

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Re: Back up
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2017, 09:07:32 AM »
I dislike Windows10 Mail.

What do you guys use?

I use Forte' Agent. A nineties vintage program, which I believe I updated in 2008 or so, and it's still being sold.

It has almost no integration with Windows, OLE/COM/DCOM or the modern equivalents thereof. It's fast and reliable. It has very poor rich text and multimedia capabilities. Just what I want - an email only program that doesn't provide a lot of junky features.

If I really want to see what an email looks like to normal non geek people I'll view it in Gmail.
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pxsant

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Re: Back up
« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2017, 09:36:23 AM »
Update.

Linux's support for HFS+ is very limited.

Take a look at the following link on StackExchange to see if it helps.

https://askubuntu.com/questions/332315/how-to-read-and-write-hfs-journaled-external-hdd-in-ubuntu-without-access-to-os

ilconsiglliere

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Re: Back up
« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2017, 09:15:00 AM »
I dislike Windows10 Mail.

What do you guys use?

Apple's Mail app on OS X/Mac OS. Admit it, you knew that was coming  >:D

Code Refugee

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Re: Back up
« Reply #23 on: August 01, 2017, 09:33:44 AM »
Apple Mail is not bad at all. It's not perfect though. However, it allows the use of plug-ins that have total access to the app. After upgrading it with a plug-in it was fantastic, allowing annotations, custom labels and color labeling of every message, and AI driven automated filing that placed new mail in folders based on what you typically did with mail of that sort.

Never mind Windows. I gave up on it. I'm on Ubuntu now. Which is not perfect, but it doesn't spy on me constantly. The terrible mail program was unacceptable, and when I tried Outlook it was a total and complete UI disaster (ribbons are absolute shit) and turned out to be a trialware that requires a subscription to upgrade. Screw that.

Disadvantages of Ubuntu so far:
  Latest VLC just kernel panics on it.
  1/2 the battery life of Windows.
  Annoying neckbeards/AfHs on help forums.

Advantages:
  Less spying. (No spying? Not sure.)
  Cool app store where everything is free and no login or account required.
  It's unix. Nuff said. apt-get this, apt-get that. Woo hoo.
  Used by developers not consumers and biz types so it's got lots of development stuff freely available.



Another update, on the burned Mac desktop, I replaced the power supply with a reclaim one off ebay, which allowed me to boot from a restore DVD and find out that the hard drive had done a platter crash. As I had the hard drive partitioned it only wiped out 2 of the partitions. I was able to image the 2 other ones in the couple hours I had before the rest of the drive was wiped out and went down for good, making crackling noises. It appears there is random errors in many files on the recovered images though. But I did get partially intact copies of a couple text files I was working on that were especially important. I've got a system running off an external hard drive right now, but it has weird problems with it, I think some chip has gone wonky, it has bizarre problems with booting and needs to be hand managed. So it seems there's some other damage to the machine as well. This running is just a temp solution. I've not been able to restore things to how they were before. However, the system is faster as I'm running off a new reinstall.

The laptop that got fried by the lightening hit is still dead. Plan to pull the drive on that when I have a chance and see if anything can be recovered.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 09:51:26 AM by Code Refugee »